Hotel Sex Trafficking Problems Could Have Been Stopped

Harvey Kirk

By Harvey Kirk
Posted January 24, 2020

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The sexual abuse attorneys of Saiontz & Kirk, P.A. are reviewing potential claims against a number of national hotel chains, which have ignored active sex trafficking operations for years, allowing adult and minor women to be subjected to extreme and violent injuries while being held against their will at hotels nationwide.

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Saiontz & Kirk, PA, Attorneys & Lawyers, Baltimore, MD

Rather than taking steps to prevent sex trafficking problems at their hotels, these companies placed profits before the health and wellbeing of women and children nationwide.

As a result, financial compensation may be available for individuals who were subjected inside of hotel rooms to incidents of:

  • Sexual Assault
  • Kidnapping or False Imprisonment
  • Forced Sexual Slavery
  • Economic Slavery
  • Child Sexual Abuse

Many hotels actually maintained business models that were designed to attract and foster human trafficking in their facilities, allowing entire floors to become commercial sex operations. Sex traffickers were permitted to disable hotel phones, prevent staff from cleaning the rooms for extended periods of time and openly bring non-registered guests in and out of the rooms on a regular basis while women and minor children inside were being held in forced sexual slavery.

To review a potential claim for yourself or a loved one, request a free consultation and claim evaluation.

Hotel Sex Trafficking Lawyers

The William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) makes human sex trafficking illegal in the United States. However, it also makes anyone who knowingly provides or obtains commercial sex through force, fraud and coercion guilty of sex trafficking as well.

According to allegations raised in a growing number of sex trafficking lawsuits being pursued by survivors nationwide, hotels have an obligation not to financially benefit from any ventures that they knew, or should have known, violated human sex trafficking laws. The TVPRA requires hotels to not only avoid participation in sex trafficking, but to put policies in place that are sufficient to identify and prevent such activities from occurring at their hotels.

About 80% of all arrests for human trafficking occur in or around hotels, and reports suggest that incidents at hotels account for 90% of the commercial exploitation of children.

Hotel staff should be trained to identify obvious and well-known signs of human sex trafficking, and policies should be in place to prevent the activity or report it to the authorities. Yet that has not occurred in recent years.

In some of the most egregious reports, hotel staff and managers have been found to actively participate in the illegal ventures, providing special services to known human traffickers, aiding in the use of hotel rooms as havens of forced sexual slavery of women and children, and even providing look-out and covering activities that allowed human traffickers to operate in relative safety.

Often, certain hotels are known locally to be bastions of human sex trafficking. However, even when hotel staff may want to address the sex trafficking problem, large chains and hotel operators often have policies in place that penalize actions that may result in room vacancies or the loss of profits.

All claims are reviewed by our hotel sex trafficking lawyers under a contingency fee agreement, which means that there are no fees or expenses unless a recovery is obtained. Individuals who have suffered kidnapping, rape, forced prostitution, physical assault or other injuries associated with sex trafficking in a hotel may have important legal rights.

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